Friday, 3 April 2015

[Game of Thrones] is the sequel to [Battlestar Galactica] and the White Walkers are Cylons


"All this has happened before, and all of it will happen again."

In Battlestar Galactica, mankind creates a robotic race called the Cylons. The Cylons turn on their creators and develop further, rendering themselves indistinguishable from humans. They attack and destroy the Colonies of Man and the survivors flee, searching for a new home planet. It turns out that history is a cycle, and that the events of the show repeat themselves again and again, with the victors of the battle building new Cylons that turn on their masters, and so on. At the end of the show, the Cylons and humans find a new planet to call home and join forces, settling it together and destroying their fleet so they could start again without technology in the hope that this new start will stop this cycle once and for all.

It failed. Because they settled Westeros.

Given the end of Battlestar Galactica, it is easy to argue that it could be the prequel to anything. However, both Battlestar Galactica and Game of Thrones share many uncanny coincidences:

  • A mysterious woman in a red dress (Number Six and Melisandre) with magical powers talks of a monotheistic god.
  • God/gods are real and influence the world in various subtle ways.
  • Prophecy is very important and exists.
  • Both shows invest heavy in the idea of circularity: that is where events in the past are doomed to repeat: in Battlestar, this is the rise of the Cylons and the extinction of mankind, in Game of Thrones this is the invasion of the White Walkers during the long winter and the rise of a hero to stop them.
  • Resurrection is key to both stories: the Cylons can resurrect and Starbuck returns from the dead, and in Game of Thrones there are many resurrection powers clearly displayed, most notable in Beric Dondarrian and Lady Stoneheart
  • The Cylons have the ability to transfer their minds to other bodies, even after death. This sounds suspiciously similar to warging.
  • The seasons in Westeros are completely out of whack. A winter may last decades, may last a few months, or might not happen for years. Why could this be? At the end of Battlestar Galactica, Admiral Adama sent the fleet into the sun to destroy it. Sending a nuclear powered fleet into a sun is a terrible idea, and may have had dire unforeseen consequences on the environment.
  • The colonists who settle the new world at the end of Battlestar Galactica decided to start again from scratch and not make the mistakes of their predecessors. They threw away all their technology. This anti-technology movement explains why technology in Westeros moves at a snails pace, being trapped at medieval level for 8000 years of recorded history and beyond.
  • While the Cylons looked human to all intents and purposes, their blood was different. The Sharon Cylon was able to interface with Galactica's systems by pushing an input jack into her veins. Blood magic is important and is seen to work in Westeros, but it doesn't work with every blood. Perhaps it only works with those who have the special Cylon blood in their ancestry? This could also explain the internet-like Weirwood net that stretches across Westeros, some sort of organic surveillance device perhaps based on organic Cylon technology.
  • An important religious symbol in Westeros is the Andal Star, a seven-sided star representing the gods. Is it any coincidence that the Cylons fly about in vehicles called Basestars and the humans had a Battlestar? Basestars have six points not seven, but this may be due to corrupted race memory, or the seventh point being added later, as this represents the Stranger, who is Death. Or a Basestar plus a Battlestar equals seven points, as they were united at the end.
  • Indeed, worship of the Seven is a big religion in Westeros. In Battlestar Galactica there were seven public Cylon models (it was only with the secret 'Final Five' that all twelve were revealed).
  • What is a dragon? Perhaps it is a native creature of the planet. Or maybe it is a Cylon Raider. We know these ships have organic interiors with just a metal shell. They are described as little more than "animals". Animals with wings. A dragon could be the evolved form of the Cylon Raider, explaining why only those with special (Cylon) bloodlines are able to control them.

One of the key themes of Battlestar Galactica was the ethics of technology and how it affects us and what it means to be human as a result of that. As we know, any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic, and the world of Westeros certainly has lots of magic!

All this has happened before, and all of it will happen again.

It is happening again, as it has always happened. What are Cylons? They are the new life forms (not necessarily robots, as the Battlestar Cylons were organic) created by man that turn on their masters and replace them, and then the cycle repeats. White Walkers are Cylons. We know they are magical entities. Thanks to the show, we know they are artificial, magically created as we see a White Walker transform a human baby into a White Walker.

The plots are identical. Advanced technology/magic creates new life (Cylons/White Walkers). They attack their creators but are beaten back (the first Cylon War / the Long Night). Years later they return out of nowhere with a massive force to exterminate their creators who are completely unprepared.

Adama failed at the end of Battlestar Galactica. The cycle wasn't broken.

All this has happened before, and all of it will happen again.



2 comments:

  1. Both shows invest heavy in the idea of circularity: that is where events in the past are doomed to repeat: in Battlestar, this is the rise of the Cylons and the extinction of mankind, in Game of Thrones this is the invasion of the White Walkers during the long winter and the rise of a hero to stop them.

    Are you idiot? Those things are two different things. It means that you haven't understand at all what Battlestar galactica is all about if you compare it with white walker phenomenon. In battlestar galactica these things don't happen in past... but in another cycle of the universe. In GOT white walkers invaded once in the past, a few thousand of year ago and right now they are about to do it for the second time. So those things have nothing in common. Two different things.

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  2. No. In Battlestar the events that repeat actually happened in the past, in the same universe. The seven colonies (seven pointed star) was populated by kobol. Kobol was supposed to be a world where they had abandoned technology after an earlier seven colonies had made the mistake of making AI that turned on them. They later found out the people of Kobol were part machine also...so like Westeros kind of. I dig this theory and love that someone else already thought of it.

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